While graffiti may be  one of the most popular forms of street art today, there is an undesirable side-effect to this art form—a large number of empty spray paint cans.    Used spray cans  are often discarded by graffiti artists on-site—not only do they become unsightly litter, but it’s also a waste to throw these cans away when they still have untapped artistic potential.    The artists at  non-profit recycling project Canlove collect used spray paint cans and transform them into stunning works of art.    By deconstructing,  painting and arranging these cans into unexpectedly beautiful bouquet-like forms, they have given these former trash a new lease of life. 

 source: Design TAXI

While graffiti may be one of the most popular forms of street art today, there is an undesirable side-effect to this art form—a large number of empty spray paint cans.

Used spray cans are often discarded by graffiti artists on-site—not only do they become unsightly litter, but it’s also a waste to throw these cans away when they still have untapped artistic potential.

The artists at non-profit recycling project Canlove collect used spray paint cans and transform them into stunning works of art.

By deconstructing, painting and arranging these cans into unexpectedly beautiful bouquet-like forms, they have given these former trash a new lease of life.

source: Design TAXI

By perfecting the  atmosphere in a room, Dutch artist  Berndnaut Smilde  makes clouds appear out of thin air.    In what seems like  Photoshop or magic, Smilde carefully regulates the humidity, temperature and light of a space—and when the moment is right, he summons the cloud using a fog machine.    The cottony cloud  only lasts a few moments for it to be captured on film, and suspends in the middle of the room just before it collapses—evoking a sense of surrealism and ephemerality of nature. 
  Watch Video:  Click Here   

 via: Design Taxi

By perfecting the atmosphere in a room, Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde makes clouds appear out of thin air.

In what seems like Photoshop or magic, Smilde carefully regulates the humidity, temperature and light of a space—and when the moment is right, he summons the cloud using a fog machine.

The cottony cloud only lasts a few moments for it to be captured on film, and suspends in the middle of the room just before it collapses—evoking a sense of surrealism and ephemerality of nature.

Watch Video: Click Here

via: Design Taxi

Contemporary artist Nariman Fadakar will be visiting The Cass this week [Friday 9th November] to speak to  Level 6 Design School students on the subject ‘Work Placement and The Entrepreneur’ 
 Nariman Fadakar is a London-based contemporary artist born in Esfahan, Iran in 1979. Nariman studied at the Chelsea College of Art and Design and graduated from London Metropolitan University in Design Studies. After his academic studies, he worked for an architecture firm as a 3D visualizer and graphic designer. 
 Nariman uses a visionary blend of graffiti, fine art and architectural techniques including oils, acrylic paint, airbrush, photography and collage, realised on a variety of canvases. Nariman’s work is characterised by the use of strong colours.“As a child I was always sketching. My sketches were based on the organic forms and floral motifs that surrounded me.” 
 Fascination with objects around him, from lavishly painted tea glasses to silk scarves worn by his mother, result in the use of glass and textiles as means to present his artwork.

Contemporary artist Nariman Fadakar will be visiting The Cass this week [Friday 9th November] to speak to  Level 6 Design School students on the subject ‘Work Placement and The Entrepreneur’

Nariman Fadakar is a London-based contemporary artist born in Esfahan, Iran in 1979. Nariman studied at the Chelsea College of Art and Design and graduated from London Metropolitan University in Design Studies. After his academic studies, he worked for an architecture firm as a 3D visualizer and graphic designer.

Nariman uses a visionary blend of graffiti, fine art and architectural techniques including oils, acrylic paint, airbrush, photography and collage, realised on a variety of canvases. Nariman’s work is characterised by the use of strong colours.“As a child I was always sketching. My sketches were based on the organic forms and floral motifs that surrounded me.”

Fascination with objects around him, from lavishly painted tea glasses to silk scarves worn by his mother, result in the use of glass and textiles as means to present his artwork.

The Design Museum and Swarovski are collaborating to challenge designers to explore the future of memory in the fast developing digital age.

Over the past decade Swarovski’s design and architecture commissions have served as an important experimental platform for leading figures in design to conceptualise, develop and share their most radical ideas.

Source: Design Museum